New Books – February 2005

New Books – February 2005

Hell Under Fire, edited by Christopher W. Morgan and Robert A. Peterson. Although the historic doctrine of hell has been contested since the Enlightenment, the past 50 years have witnessed a new and unsettling development. Attacks that used to come from outside the church are now coming from within. This is especially true with regard to two aberrations: Universalism (which says all persons will ultimately be saved) and Annihilationism (which says the wicked will ultimately cease to exist). This book lays a solid foundation for the historical teaching about hell; contributors include Daniel Block, Sinclair Ferguson, Al Mohler, Jr., J.I. Packer, et al.The Myth of the Perfect Mother: Rethinking the Spirituality of Women, by Carla Barnhill. The author believes that too often the church presents ideals of motherhood that are somewhat unrealistic. Mothers are told their sole worth is established by their role as mom. And as a result they put so much effort into raising and praising their kids that they forget who they really are. Carla Barnhill shows how to dismiss those cultural ideals of perfection and reminds you that your ultimate worth lies not in motherhood but in your relationship with God. She also examines the question of whether contemporary Christianity has idealized and idolized the family to an unbiblical degree.John Elias: Life, Letters and Essays, by Edward Morgan. North Wales in the early part of the 19th century provides a striking instance of the way in which a spiritual revolution can change the whole direction of a people and a society, and the agency which brought the prevailing indifference and lawlessness to an end was the preaching of the gospel by men without position or influence like John Elias (1774-1881). Under his preaching the outlook of thousands was permanently changed, and when he died, 10,000 attended his funeral.God, Marriage, and Family: Rebulding the Biblical Foundation, by Andreas J. Kostenberger with David W. Jones. In a time of crisis regarding marriage and the family, the authors provide an integrated, biblical treatment of the full range of marriage and family issues. John Piper says, “the special value of this book lies again in its pervasive exposition of Scripture”.Reclaiming the Center: Confronting the Evangelical Accommodation in Postmodern Times, edited by Millard J. Erickson, Paul Kjoss Helseth, and Justin Taylor. Al Moehler says that “compromise and confusion stand at the center of evangelicalism’s theological crisis, and a clear-headed and convictional analysis of the problems has been desperately needed. Thankfully (this book) has arrived just in time”.The Holy Trinity: In Scripture, History, Theology, and Worship, by Robert Letham. When it comes to the doctrine of the Trinity, evangelicals have underachieved, and the author hopes to redress this shortcoming. Writing from a clearly Reformed position, he offers a well-researched volume about “the One who is utterly transcendent and incomprehensible”.The Message of Heaven and Hell, by Bruce Milne (The Bible Speaks Today series). The topic of life and judgment beyond death is one that has occupied the minds of Christians in former eras, but today seems to be in partial eclipse. Milne guides us from Genesis to Revelation, examining key texts that illumine the destiny of humanity, the nature of heaven and hell, and the glory of life everlasting in the presence of God.New Dictionary of Theology, edited by Sinclair B. Ferguson, David F. Wright, and J.I. Packer. Since its publication in 1988, this dictionary has rapidly established itself as a standard authoritative reference work in the field of systematic and historical theology.Colossians Remixed: Subverting the Empire, by Brian J. Walsh and Sylvia C. Keesmaat. The authors’ goal is to bring the ancient world of Colossians and the contemporary world of North America crashing together.Mere Discipleship: Radical Christianity in a Rebellious World, by Lee C. Camp. The author’s goal is to make us wrestle with uncomfortable and impolite questions, daring to ask what everyday life might be like if Christians pledged ultimate allegiance to God’s inbreaking kingdom rather than to the kingdoms of this world.The Kingdom of Christ: The New Evangelical Perspective, by Russell D. Moore. Bruce Ware says this is “an enlightening account of the merging theological vision of recent dispensational and covenant theologies and a stirring call for a unified evangelical social engagement”.Good Fences: The Boundaries of Hospitality, by Caroline A. Westerhoff. Hospitality and inclusion are important to the Church; we want to welcome the stranger, or the new idea. But in order to have something worth welcoming others to, we have to know who we are and what we stand for. Welcome and inclusion are not the same thing. The author’s aim is to show how to maintain boundaries that provide a strong foundation for our own identity without being so rigid that we never consider anyone or anything new.Obsessed, by Ted Dekker (a new book from the author known world-wide for his page-turning, adrenaline-laced thrillers).CHILDREN/YOUTH'S FICTION BOOKS I’d Be Your Hero: A Royal Tale of Godly Character, by Kathryn O’Brien; What Color Is Love: A Parable of God’s Gifts, by Nan Gurley; The Lord’s Prayer, from Spirit Press; Joseph and His Coat of Many Colors, Daniel in the Lion’s Den, and Moses Parting the Red Sea, by Tess Fries. DVDs: The Moaning, Groaning Magpie(Buzz & Poppy);Praise Parade Singalong Songs(Miss Patty Cake);The Roach Approach: Don’t Miss the Boat(the story of Noah from a new perspective);God Good, Idols Bad(HoopDogz).

0 Comments

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.